Driving Theory Test Tips Driving Your Car

Consider driving less:

In the UK, more carbon dioxide (CO2) comes from people’s car travel than from any other kind of UK transport. Reducing your car travel is a key step to reducing climate change effects and local air pollution.

Nearly a quarter of all car trips are under two miles, a distance you can cycle in less than 15 minutes. Cycling and walking distances under two miles could help you get fitter and save you money in fuel. You could also consider:

* planning ahead so you can combine car trips * car sharing * using public transport

Practical driving test tips for car drivers:

Before driving off: Making life easier for your engine can mean you use less fuel and produce fewer emissions.

Pump up your tyres: Under-inflated tyres create more resistance, making your engine work harder. This can increase your fuel consumption by up to 3 per cent.

Adjusting your tyres regularly, especially before long journeys, can help your car use less fuel and could increase the life of the tyres. Cars with heavier loads may need different air pressure and over-inflating tyres can be unsafe, so check your car manual for the correct pressure.

Tyres that lessen resistance: Some tyres are designed to reduce resistance between the tyre and the road surface (known as ‘rolling resistance’). Low rolling resistance tyres help to reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. From November 2012, tyre dealers will give information on tyres’ rolling resistance, wet grip performance and noise. Rolling resistance will be rated from A (best) to G (worst). Information may be provided for many tyres before November 2012 – ask your tyre dealer when you’re next buying tyres.

Clear out any extra weight: Remove unnecessary clutter and roof racks. This will reduce your car’s weight and air resistance.

Have your vehicle serviced regularly: Well-maintained cars in good condition tend to run more efficiently. Check how often your car should be serviced by looking in the owner’s manual or contacting the vehicle manufacturer.

If you carry out any work yourself, remember that waste from car maintenance (like old engine oil) is often hazardous. Dispose of it safely using council waste facilities.

Plan your route : Planning your route in advance, and using a map or satnav (satellite navigation system), can help you take the shortest route and avoid getting lost (For car and motorbike theory test).

While driving your car: Travelling at a constant 37 mph in fifth gear uses 25 per cent less fuel than in third gear. Following the smarter driving tips below could cut your CO2 emissions by around 8 per cent. This could add up to an annual fuel saving of up to one month per year.

Drive at an appropriate speed:

Driving at 50 miles per hour (mph) instead of 70 mph can improve fuel economy by 25 per cent. Driving at slower speeds also gives you time to anticipate traffic ahead, helping you drive more smoothly.

Speed up and slow down smoothly: Every time you stop and start, your engine uses more fuel and produces more emissions. Check the road ahead and slow down early, giving the traffic time to start moving again before you reach it. You can then speed up again without needing to stop.

Change gears at the right time: Changing up gears a little earlier can reduce revs per minute (rpm) and reduce your fuel usage. If you drive a diesel car, try shifting up when the rev counter reaches 2,000 rpm. For a petrol car, change up at 2,500 rpm. Remember to change down a gear at the right time too – if your car is struggling, it will also use more fuel.

Avoid leaving your engine running: If you’re likely to be at a standstill for more than three minutes, switch off the engine. When the engine is idling, you’re wasting fuel.

Source: DSA